Dragescent Wiki
Advertisement

Magic system is mostly determined by mages and races. Mage generals are your spellcasters, they cast and organize all your magic actions and transform raw mana into spells. Each race has mages of varying strength and has access to its specific spells and number of cores (1-3). Cores serve as spell packaging, you must use cores for all spells that you are casting outside of your governorate by simply placing any given spell in any available core. However, the more spells in one core, the more expensive those spells will become. This is called core complexity and by default grows by 10% per each spell in the core. Races with more cores have an advantage, they can distribute their spells more evenly and cast them more efficiently.


Limits of spells

Each specific spell can be cast on each governorate only once per count – you can’t cast two Dragon Breath’s on governorate A at the same count. If that happens, the more efficient spell is calculated.

But different spells with the same effect stack – you can’t cast twice on yourself Mirror of Niteen, but you can cast on yourself Mirror of Niteen and have teammate cast Sphere of protection on you for a total of +5 to your mage defence.

And in the same way, you can’t cast Plague on your opponent’s governorate twice, but you can cast Plague and your teammate can cast Life Drain and their effects (lowering pop growth) will stack.

Each governorate can be affected at any time at maximum by 2 damage spells, 2 buffs and 2 debuffs.

During count, spells are calculated in this order: 1) buffs, 2) debuffs, 3) damage spells.

It doesn’t matter whether at count or during gameplay should a governorate be affected by more than 2 spells of each type, the stronger ones (with higher efficiency) will be calculated for debuffs and damage spells. For buffs, already activated buffs take precedence (if I cast 2 buffs on myself, they take precedence and buffs cast by teammates are not calculated) and after that the time they were cast.


Cores

Cores are packages for your spells and they take over the current attack strength of your mage general. They are available all the time for you to tinker with. All cores are affected by your mage general abilities, who oversees the entire spellcasting section of your governorate.


Casting spells

Players can cast spells in three ways:

  1. On themselves – casting on yourself is always immediate, doesn’t need cores, always successful, always at full strength
  2. On teammates – casting on teammates happens always during count, needs cores, is always successful and always at full strength
  3. On enemy players – casting on enemies happens always during count, needs cores, success and strength are determined based on magic attack and magic defence of attacking and defending party


Types of spells

Similarly, there are three types of spells:

  1. Buffs – helpful spells for you and your teammates, you can’t cast them on enemies, they are always successful and always at full strength.
  2. Debuffs – harmful spells used to weaken your enemies, their success is based on your magic attack and enemy’s magic defence
  3. Damage – harmful spells which cause direct damage to enemy’s population, army or buildings, their success is based on your magic attack and enemy’s magic defence


Duration of spells

There are also three types of duration:

  1. At count – these spells influence only calculations done during the count, classic example are damage spells, they are cast destroy for example 10% of enemy army during your magic phase and they are done
  2. Number of counts – these spells come into effect as soon as you cast them on yourself or after the count, work during your turns and during the count. For example, buffs for mage attack, as soon as you cast them, your mage gets increased strength and cores he creates are stronger and his increased strength can influence the count as well. It expires after the number of counts has passed.
  3. Number of turns – these spells come into effect as soon as you cast them on yourself or after the count, work during your turns and expire after the number of turns has passed. For example, debuffs against your pop growth, your pop grows more slowly for a certain number of turns.


Efficiency

Efficiency of your spells is calculated from attack and defence of mage generals. Following table shows all possibilities. The difference is according to an attacking general, the first line is when attack is 5 or more higher then defence and the last line is when defence is 5 or more higher then attack.


Spells efficiency
Difference

Attack - Defence

Efficiency
5 or more 100%
4 90%
3 80%
2 70%
1 60%
0 50%
-1 40%
-2 30%
-3 20%
-4 10%
-5 or more 0% - the spell fails


Efficiency works differently for different types of spells.


Buffs

Whether they are cast on yourself or on your teammate (they can’t be cast on enemies), whether they work immediately for number of turns or at count or for number of counts, are unaffected by efficiency and ALWAYS work at 100%.


Debuff

Spells can also be cast only on enemies and they work two ways. Either for number of turns or at count. Their effect is largely based on efficiency, except for general debuffs – you can’t lower general’s strength by 2,34 for example. Here apply the same rules as for killing pops by damage spells. Only the negative effect itself is affected, turns are set and don’t change.

Example: Attacker casts debuff spell, that lowers pop growth by 50 for 7 turns. The attacker (necromancer) whose mage general has attack 8 and the defender's defence of mage is 6 (elf). The diffence is +2 and the spell has 70% efficiency. The spell lowers pop growth by 50*0,7=35 and still for 7 turns. Only the negative effect itself is affected, turns are set and don’t change. In a case the mage general of defender would have defence 4 (human), the efficiency would be 90% and the spell effect -45 pop growth for 7 turns.

Example: Attacker casts debuff spell, that lowers mage general defence by 2. It has efficiency of 80%. The spell lowers mage general defence by 2*0,8=1,6. That means, that his defence is lowered by 1 for sure and there is 60% chance that it will lowered by 2.


Damage

Spells can be cast only on enemies and always work at count. Their effect is determined largely by efficiency and little by random. Each integer is a guaranteed effect and remainder serves as % chance to advance to the next integer. Except for damage done to buildings, damage to buildings can be directly multiplied by efficiency without any problems.

Example: Attacker casts Dragon’s breath. Dragon’s breath, among other things, deals 100 damage to 2 buildings. It has efficiency of 80%, therefore it does 100*0,8 = 80 damage to 2 buildings.

Example: Attacker casts Dragon’s breath. One of its effect is killing 10% population. It has efficiency of 80%. Target has 40 population. Therefore it kills 40*0,1*0,8=3,2 pops. That means, that 3 pops are killed for sure and there is 20% chance for 1 additional pop to be killed.

Example: Attacker casts Dragon’s breath. One of its effect is killing 10% population. It has efficiency of 20%. Target has 40 population. Therefore it kills 40*0,1*0,2=0,8 pops. That means, that 1 pop is killed with 80% chance.


Empowered mode

Debuff and damage spells can be cast either in standard mode, which is assumed in previous text, or in empowered mode. Spells cast in empowered mode have +50% cost, +50% increase in core complexity (15% instead of 10%) and spell efficiency +30%. Spell efficiency cannot be higher than 100%.

Advertisement